Menu

September 18, 2019

A New Composition for Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

Professor Till MacIvor Meyn composed a new tune for Conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya’s last season and revamped an American classic.

September 18, 2019

A New Composition for Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

Professor Till MacIvor Meyn composed a new tune for Conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya’s last season and revamped an American classic.

A TCU professor’s composition gave the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra a new spark.

Till MacIvor Meyn, professor of music theory and composition, wrote a piece entitled Remix to commemorate Miguel Harth-Bedoya’s last season as the group’s conductor. The song premiered at the orchestra’s Sept. 13 season opening.

“The fact that Maestro Miguel has been with the symphony for 20 years, and he’s such an amazing musician, made it easier for me to write something that really focused on how wonderful he is,” Meyn said.

The composer and conductor’s friendship started with an after-school carpool more than a decade ago.

Till MacIvor Meyn, professor of music theory and composition, composed a new tune for the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra and revamped an American classic. Photo by Olaf Growald

Till MacIvor Meyn, professor of music theory and composition, composed a new tune for the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra and revamped an American classic. Photo by Olaf Growald

“I would go to pick up the kids from school and he would be there picking his kids up. And we just got to talking after a while,” said Meyn. “You know over the course of months and years we just got to know each other really well.”

Harth-Bedoya asked the award-winning composer to write something for the upcoming season.

“When I ask a composer to write a brand new piece of music, I’m not really sure what I’m going to get because they are free to write anything,” Harth-Bedoya said.

But he said he’s pleased with the results. “I just like the fact that he’s a composer that reaches the listener, and he’s got a unique and direct message.”

Meyn composed the piece over the course of four months, balancing his time in the classroom with time by the piano.

He drew influences from Latin American music like salsa and tango in homage to Harth-Bedoya’s native Perú.

“I just like any music that challenges me whether it’s simple or complicated,” said Harth-Bedoya.

The conductor set a new standard for the orchestra in his 20-year run, paying special attention to mastery and professionalism, Meyn said.

Miguel Harth-Bedoya has been music director fo the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra since 2000. Photo by Michal Novak

Miguel Harth-Bedoya has been music director fo the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra since 2000. Photo by Michal Novak

“In rehearsal today I was listening, and I was practically crying when I heard them practicing,” Meyn said. “There’s no reason why it couldn’t be the New York Philharmonic playing. They’re just so fantastic.”

Harth-Bedoya said he’s proud of his time with the orchestra. He said he made a point to keep every concert different, whether it’s with the music choice or the structure.

“It keeps live music alive and engaging and relevant to an audience,” he said.

To keep the audience on its toes, Harth-Bedoya also wanted a new version of The Star-Spangled Banner that leads every concert. The new arrangement premiered at the orchestra’s first show this season.

Meyn composed that, too. He said he paid attention to changing the harmonies while keeping the iconic melody the same. “I hope that people will hear it as something like the next step in the evolution of this wonderful piece.”