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Chancellor Says Service Learning Serves All

Students learn valuable life lessons when they bring their skills and energy to community projects.

Chancellor Says Service Learning Serves All

Students learn valuable life lessons when they bring their skills and energy to community projects.

Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr.

Over the years, I have observed how location is an important factor in the college decision for our potential students. Understandably, students look at Fort Worth and the surrounding area and consider what kind of community they’ll be part of during their time at Texas Christian University.

In this regard, we are fortunate: Fort Worth is a beautiful destination city, a supportive hometown known for its friendliness and warm welcome. But there’s another important aspect to our location, and that is its value as a place to truly connect and make positive change.

In this issue, you’ll find stories about TCU classes that take learners beyond campus and into the hearts of the community. Thanks to the creativity and generosity of our faculty and staff, service learning teaches what really matters — instilling lifetime leadership skills that improve the lives of others, casting a light on opportunities that shape students into change-makers and inspiring positive forces wherever they may go.

Fort Worth is such a wonderful learning lab. Applying service to academic endeavors elevates our community and our perspectives, creating a situation where everyone flourishes: students, faculty, staff and the people around us.

This symbiotic relationship between TCU and the community reinforces the notion that there is always something beyond ourselves, and an obligation to do something with what we learn. As responsible citizens, it is our duty as Horned Frogs to use new knowledge and skills for the benefit of society.

We find inspiration of service learning in the lives of others in the TCU family. Emeritus Trustee Robert J. Wright ’50 lived his life fully until his death on Jan. 17, 2019. Trustee Wright was remembered in his obituary as a rare individual who possessed the ability to see a “societal need” and “fix” the missing element that was not working properly. His lifelong philosophy to meet the needs in his community resulted in his pioneering work in creating the “Medical Mall” concept that transformed the future of health care design. His service did not stop there, as he shared his leadership skills with his church as founder of its foundation and assisted with several church expansions and renovations. Ever a visionary, he left a legacy of “change for good.” His story inspires us all.

TCU student Amanda Smiley practices reading with Emily Guzman at Mary Louise Phillips Elementary school in Fort Worth. Photo by Ross Hailey

TCU student Amanda Smiley practices reading with Emily Guzman at Mary Louise Phillips Elementary School in Fort Worth. Photo by Ross Hailey

Having personally seen the life-changing work being done at the Gatehouse and other local nonprofit organizations, I am so proud of members of the TCU family for their part in living out TCU’s mission: To educate individuals to think and act as ethical leaders and responsible citizens in the global community. 

To the city of Fort Worth and the surrounding community: thank you for helping us create the values-centered leaders of tomorrow. You provide outlets for us to achieve our greatest potential. Giving back is the least we can do in return.

Victor J. Boschini, Jr.
v.boschini@tcu.edu